One of the most commonly overlooked, yet consistent behavior problems among most dogs is jumping up. While you might not necessarily see it as a problem that he jumps up and and nearly attacks you at the door every time (because let’s be serious, who wouldn’t want to be greeted with the excitement?!), it actually can be a dangerous habit. If he’s used to doing this when you open the door, he won’t hesitate when it’s a small child, elderly person, or someone with physical disabilities. Because of the safety issues it can cause, it’s important to train your dog to stop jumping and learn a different way to greet people.

Why They Jump

Although there are several theories of why dogs may jump up on people, the most obvious reason is that they want attention. If they’ve been home alone all day, they probably have tons of bottled up energy that they just can’t help but explode with excitement when you walk through the door! Even if you yell at them to get down, the negative attention you’re giving them may send the wrong message. After all, it is attention and that’s what they were looking for.

Putting a Stop to Jumping 

Retraining your dog on this behavior will take consistency and patience, but will be well worth it when he learns how to properly greet guests. Here are a few tips to try while training:

  • Withhold Attention: In this case, no attention is better than negative attention. Rather than scolding him, or pushing him to get off of you, trying completely ignoring him. Turn your back from him, cross your arms, walk away, and don’t say a word. If he’s jumping on you as soon as you walk in the door, you can try walking out completely and entering again in a few moments when he has calmed down. He needs to learn that jumping up will not give him the attention he wants, but rather just the opposite; no attention.
  • Reward Good Behavior: As with any training session, having treats handy is always helpful. Since you’re trying to teach him to not jump, when he finally greets you with all 4 paws on the ground, toss him a treat. Rewarding the behavior you desire, rather than scolding the wrong behaviors works wonders with your dog.
  • Use the Sit Command: When your dog has mastered greeting you with all 4 paws on the ground for a few seconds, start using the sit command. Reward your dog with a treat once he sits. Over time, your dog will learn to sit when you enter the room or walk through the door.
  • Practice With Others: While it’s good to first master the skill with you, the owner, you’ll also want to make sure he’ll use the skill when other guests enter the house. Try asking a family member or friend to practice with your dog. This way he’ll understand that sitting/staying down is the desired behavior no matter who enters the room!

Contact Argos Dog Training

Does your dog have a problem with jumping up on others, or any other obedience issues? The experts at Argos Dog Training can help. We offer a variety of private and group training programs to correct these behaviors using efficient training techniques. Contact us today to learn more!